The Weak Signal Propagation Reporter Network is a group of amateur radio operators using K1JT's MEPT_JT digital mode to probe radio frequency propagation conditions using very low power (QRP/QRPp) transmissions. The software is open source, and the data collected are available to the public through this site.

Beside the WSPRlite tool http://www.dxplorer.net/
there is also a free site http://wsprlive.net/

Now qrv with WSPRlite https://www.sotabeams.co.uk/wsprlite
200mW , 30m , Dipole.

Anybody knows details of device hardware ?
Looks like it's all done with a PIC32MX130F256B.

After a period, (about 20 years!) I have started operating again with renewed interest.

During the time of inactivity, I had a small stroke which made chatting verbally, which was always a problem for me, even more difficult so I was delighted on rediscovering ham radio that everything had moved on and a large part of it had become much more computer orientated which suited me because as a professional computer programmer this met my needs excellently.

I have been running WSPR successfully at 0.5 watts on 20 metres, on and off for a few months.

Usually it will work for a few days and then stops uploading spots to the web site. I get the error message in the attached file. WSPR continues to transmit and I continue to be reported by receiving stations. I continue to gather signal reports, but they do not get uploaded to the web site.

It looks like a program bug. Maybe someone can look at it and fix it?

Ran rig on 40m last night and got a nice TU in chat from K4RCG for the spot (he spotted me twice as well) on a new antenna he had just put up. I normally would not have even had seen that posted if something hadn't 'led' me to click on the chat button this morning right before switching Rig to 17m; that, in addition to the regular commenting on my blog posts, well, that makes me feel I am doing something for somebody, and I really appreciate that and feel welcomed and accepted and appreciated, TU guys. :)

Nada, zip, "shum davar", "klum"...

I knew that none of the bands are doing so great right now, or so, everyone is saying... of course, it is all relative... I'm sure conditions are quite good compared to the times when you only had a couple thousand hams globally and you actually had to work quite a bit to make any contacts... hence the term, "working on 20m," etc...

Starting the WSPR on 20m tonight at 19:58z, 2017.09.22... not much going on as I expected... I believe 20m is a band that can also open up at night, though less so than 30m, and much less so than 40m or 80m... I am assuming that 20m probably opens up more at night time during the colder winter months?? But I could be quite wrong about that...

Yesterday I worked WSPR (it worked, I slept) and I noticed that it was hugging the night trying to stay on the side of the light as the grey line moved, always trying to stay straight up the grey line and to the west, from my QTH up into Europe.

Just was bored, trying to get WSJTx up and working right on an older PC running Debian 9. Man, it is hard to love linux more than Windows, I hate to admit, when hunting down dependecies and, well, everything else! Had to use VOX on the PC since no idea yet how to get this cable with a Prolific Chip to be 'driven' yet under linux.

Between 19:30z Sept.20.2017 and 03:30z Sept.21.2017 (10:30PM Israeli time to 06:30AM Israel time, apx. 8hrs.) was the very first time ever in my life using WSPR. It was easy enough to get started after watching a short youtube video. I just left it running all night while I slept.

I let it run on 40m this first time because, to my limited understanding, 40m may very well be the most easy to predict, to notice patterns that usually repeat every day and night, for around what times propagation opens up this way or that, or when the band is closed.

Hi Gang - I'm currently monitoring 80 meters using my 8 element vertical receive array. I'll leave it pointed to the Northeast (Europe) from my sunset until about 09:30 UTC, when I'll switch the receive array to the west, before I leave for work.

I have an 8 element receive array for 160 meters also. We can try that next week.

73
Ken K4ZW (FM 18)

After practically giving up on Sunday night, I gave it a second go yesterday afternoon and am so pleased persisted cause I cannot believe the results. Woke up to find my little shed had heard signals from Texas, Canada and, the icing on the proverbial cake, Southern Australia!!! This is obviously amazing but I can't help but wonder where do I go now, how can you top Australia? One thing's for certain, I'll be leaving the current set up just the way it is for a few more days yet, I'm positively hooked to the map, and will be investigating transmission next.

Must have spent four hours farting around with various receivers and frequency combinations yesterday evening without decoding a single transmission. Installed a programme to keep a check on the PC's clock this afternoon, mucked about with the Sangean's frequency and it's been gravy since. Bagged some stations from the far north of Finland and as far away as Bulgaria. Overjoyed to see we picked up a signal from as far south as Palma, our favourite holiday destination. Loving this, can't wait to start transmitting.

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